The Rules of Art

Written with verve and intensity (and a good bit of wordplay), this is the long-awaited study of Flaubert and the modern literary field that constitutes the definitive work on the sociology of art by one of the world’s leading social theorists. Drawing upon the history of literature and art from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, Bourdieu develops an original theory of art conceived as an autonomous value. He argues powerfully against those who refuse to acknowledge the interconnection between art and the structures of social relations within which it is produced and received. As Bourdieu shows, art’s new autonomy is one such structure, which complicates but does not eliminate the interconnection.

The literary universe as we know it today took shape in the nineteenth century as a space set apart from the approved academies of the state. No one could any longer dictate what ought to be written or decree the canons of good taste. Recognition and consecration were produced in and through the struggle in which writers, critics, and publishers confronted one another.

Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory

With new entries and sensitive edits, this fifth edition places J.A. Cuddon’s indispensable dictionary firmly in the 21st Century.

  • Written in a clear and highly readable style
  • Comprehensive historical coverage extending from ancient times to the present day
  • Broad intellectual and cultural range
  • Expands on the previous edition to incorporate the most recent literary terminology
  • New material is particularly focused in areas such as gender studies and queer theory, post-colonial theory, post-structuralism, post-modernism, narrative theory, and cultural studies.
  • Existing entries have been edited to ensure that topics receive balanced treatment

Literary Theory and Criticism

This volume offers a comprehensive account of modern literary criticism, presenting the field as part of an ongoing historical and intellectual tradition. Featuring thirty-nine specially commissioned chapters from an international team of esteemed contributors, it fills a large gap in the market by combining the accessibility of single-authored selections with a wide range of critical perspectives. The volume is divided into four parts. Part One covers the key philosophical and aesthetic origins of literary theory, while Part Two discusses the foundational movements and thinkers in the first half of the twentieth century. Part Three offers introductory overviews of the most important movements and thinkers in modern literary theory, and Part Four looks at emergent trends and future directions.

Writing Women’s Literary History

By championing the recovery of “lost” women writers and insisting on reevaluating the past, women’s studies and feminist theory have effected dramatic changes in the ways English literary history is written and taught. In Writing Women’s Literary History, Margaret Ezell critically examines these successful women’s literary histories and applies to them the same self-conscious feminism that critics have applied to more traditional methods. According to Ezell, by relying not only on past male scholarship but also on inherited notions of “tradition,” some feminist historicists replicate the evolutionary, narrative model of history that originally marginalized women who wrote before 1700. Drawing both on French feminisms and on recent historicist scholarship, Ezell points us to new possibilities for the recovery of early modern women’s literary history.

The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Volume 3, The Renaissance

This 1999 volume was the first to explore as part of an unbroken continuum the critical legacy both of the humanist rediscovery of ancient learning and of its neoclassical reformulation. Focused on what is arguably the most complex phase in the transmission of the Western literary-critical heritage, the book encompasses those issues that helped shape the way European writers thought about literature from the late Middle Ages to the late seventeenth century. These issues touched almost every facet of Western intellectual endeavour, as well as the historical, cultural, social, scientific, and technological contexts in which that activity evolved. From the interpretative reassessment of the major ancient poetic texts, this volume addresses the emergence of the literary critic in Europe by exploring poetics, prose fiction, contexts of criticism, neoclassicism, and national developments. Sixty-one chapters by internationally respected scholars are supported by an introduction, detailed bibliographies for further investigation and a full index.

Deconstruction

It could be argued that deconstruction has to a considerable extent been formed by critical accounts of it. This collection reprints a cross section of these important works, charting the ways in which deconstruction is conceptualized and demonstrating the impact it has had on a wide range of traditions. The essential pieces in this set include writings by Jacques Derrida, Jonathan Culler, Paul de Man, Barbara Johnson, and a wide range of key thinkers in areas as diverse as psychoanalysis, law, gender studies, and architecture. The major themes covered include: * Vol. 1: Part I: “What is Deconstruction?”Part II: “Philosophy”* Vol. 2: Part III: “Literary Criticism”Part IV: “Feminism and Queer Theory”* Vol. 3: Part V: “Psychoanalysis”Part VI: “Religion/Theology”Part VII: “Architecture”* Vol. 4: Part VIII: “Politics”Part IX: “Ethics”